Innovative Zero-Energy Air Conditioner Is Naturally Cooling Households In New Delhi

By Amanda Froelich Truth Theory

Due to cost constraints and environmental considerations, few families India can afford conventional air conditioning units. Fortunately, there is an aesthetically pleasing and eco-friendly alternative that is working just as well for residents in New Delhi.

Arch Daily reports that New Delhi-based Ant Studio has created a zero-electricity air conditioner that is low-tech, energy efficient and offers an artistic solution to the “problem” of sweltering temperatures. The honeycomb-like installation is made with conical clay tubes that were created using computational technologies and modern calibration techniques. Their purpose is to naturally reduce surrounding temperatures.


The zero-energy air conditioner was developed as part of a larger beautification project for DEKI Electronics. Not only does the unconventional air conditioner cool the interior of buildings, it adds an “artistic flair” to facilities.

How does it work?

When water runs down the structure — just enough to wet the cones just once or twice a day, the process of evaporation occurs. This, in turn, lowers the air temperature. Inhabitat reports, “The porous terra-cotta units absorb water that then seeps to the outer surface where it evaporates and turns into cold air. The flow of water empties out into a collection basic and gives the installation a beautiful waterfall effect.”

“I believe this experiment worked quite well functionally. Findings from this attempt opened up a lot more possibilities where we can integrate this technique with forms that could redefine the way we look at cooling systems, a necessary yet ignored component of a building’s functionality,” said Monish Siripurapu, the founder of Ant Studio. “Every installation could be treated as an art piece. The circular profile can be changed into an artistic interpretation while the falling waters lend a comforting ambience. This, intermingled with the sensuous petrichor from the earthen cylinders, could allow for it to work in any environment with the slightest of breeze.”


The architects of the invention see it as both an art installation and a feasible solution for many poverty-stricken households to combat hot, summer temperatures. Undoubtedly, it will help many, as the prototype can cool hot air above 50 degrees Celsius (or 122 degrees Fahrenheit) to temperatures less than 36 degrees Celsius around the structure. Because recycled water would require regular maintenance to clean the exterior surface, regular water is recommended for long-term use.

Via Arch Daily

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